FLORIDA WESTCOAST WOODWORKERS CLUB
serving Manatee, Sarasota, Charlotte counties

Month: February 2014 (page 1 of 3)

Shop meet Feb. 24, 2014

.Possum stew and cobbler

Around 20 people attended the shot meet at Mike Swart’s workshop last Monday. Mike came through as promised with the big pot of stew cooked on an open fire in a Dutch oven.stew When asked what was in it, he claimed it was Possum. He followed this up with another pot of cobbler served with ice cream. I can’t say for sure whether it was apple or peach, because it was gone by the time I got to it.eating

Mike gave a demonstration of his gripper push sticks, showing all the different configurations. Demo 1

But, as usual, one of the main attractions was just having time to visit with fellow club members.talking 3 talking 2 talking 1 If you miss this shop meet,  you missed out on a good time and good food. Next year Mike promises to have armadillos stew.

Turners Meet, February 17, 2014

About a half dozen members turned out to watch Denny turn a chalice as a demonstration.  One of our club members had asked him to turn one as a gift for a new priest at his church.  Before the demo, Denny had used his CAD program to design the chalice, and he had cut pieces of mahogany and pine and glued them into a blank.The concept

In making the blank, he had to be very accurate with the sizes and placement of the contrasting colored woods, or the finished product would look uneven. step 2 Then, before he could turn it, he had to plan the order of the cuts so that he always had a way to grasp it on the lathe.step 3

To make this piece, he used quite a variety of tools: a screw chuck and then his regular chuck to drive the blank, and a live tail center and then a jam chuck to support the end of the blank, and when they wouldn’t fit, he used his spindle stabilizer to support the end.Denny at work Hollowing out

When he finished, we could see the pattern of crosses and other decorative work out of pine in the side of the mahogany chalice. finishedfinishing touches

Feburary Meeting

The February meeting was our annual tool auction. Auctioneer Denny did his usual outstanding job.

Auction

We then had time for Paul Anderson to present a slide show of his miniature  rooms and the model tug boat he made. The detail was incredible! He even showed a video of the boat running with a camera inside so it looked like you were riding along. Lots of fun.

Tug Boat Willy

Tug Boat Willy

Announcements:

  • We have enough people for at least one person man the booth at the state fair in each time slot
  • A survey sheet for how to change the 2×4 contest showed that most members wanted to continue with the old rules, rather than change the wood species or quantity.
  • We are signing up people for our booth at the Woodworkers Show (Tool Show), March 21 -23 Please help, it’s fun
  • There will be a turners meet at Denny’s shop on Monday Feb 17th, 7pm.
  • Next shop Meet will be at Mike Swart’s shop Monday Feb 24th, 7pm
  • Spring picnic will be at the Rothenbach park (same location as last year) on Sunday April 29th, 2×4 contest same time.
  • March meeting speaker will be Johnie Newcomb from the Gulf Coast Carvers Guild.

Show & Tell

John Phillips brought in a picture of the wooden clock he made. After much tinkering he and modification he now has it keeping accurate time. Very cool!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I brought in a small saw horse made with compound angle legs.

Terry Bair showed a basket tray and towel rack he madeOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Fred Damaos had a large block of the scrap Mahogany he had left from the mantel he made. It was 4′ thick and 22′ wide, wow.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Denny brought a cool spiral design segmented bowl he made.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Reuel Detweiler showed two intarsia pieces he made.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Harold Haines brought a couple of delicate goblets he turned.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

–Thirty–

“Please submit your errors and corrections in writing,” sounds so formal that I hesitate to use it, but in truth it is a great convenience for those actually doing the correction.  And “writing” can be interpreted as sending an email in our digital age.  Those of you reading through the links under recent posts or under the February 2014 links will find the balance of updates and notes from club meetings to which I had access.  Like any fellow woodworker working on fifty things at once, mistakes are bound to be made.  And if you do click on those links, you will find some twenty posts that “catches” me up on the job I agreed to do in maintaining the web site.  My usual motto of “Better never late,” has become the motto of “Better late than never.”  If you look at the titles, you will see a collection of meeting times ranging all over the year 2013.   The software provides an automatic archive feature, but does not allow making posts back in time, so all the posts are listed by when they were made, and not by when the meeting occurred.  For the delay in processing those posts, I give the club my deepest apology.  All I can say is I have spent hours and hours creating those posts, downloading photographs, and working to put appropriate words together and in general figuring out websites.  My first dovetail was far easier than this.  Even so, I am absolutely positive there is more that could have been done and I am sure there are club members that would have liked me to have done more.   Sometimes there is never enough.   That brings me to my next point.

Maintaining the club website has become a burden for me and right now it is no longer fun.  Some of the posts were great to put together, some not so much, but I need a break.  I have fulfilled my obligation for a year and leave it to the 2014 officers to find a replacement.  For those members that think that more should be done, I can offer some limited advice and instruction—call me and maybe I can help you do it.  Our website can certainly serve to chronicle the events of our club while balancing the expense of attracting new members.  Still, there is more to be done, some of it for little or no expense.

For instance:

  1. Facebook is the social networking site that many young people are flocking to.  If we want to attract new members let’s focus some effort onto younger people.  Some of them are reported to spend up to eight hours a month on Facebook.
  2. Craig’s List:  I have listed and sold some donated tools for the club and the treasury is $60.00 richer from those sales.  We know woodworkers read Craig’s List.  Listings are free.  Why can’t we list upcoming club meetings in the tools for sale section of Craig’s list where woodworkers are most likely to be browsing?  Listings could also be placed under activities and or events, maybe on a different day.
  3. Can we try again for local events on MSN’s home page?  Even if we only succeed once or twice a year it is better than nothing.

Surely other members have some ideas on how to get the word out without having to increase our dues to pay for it.  Chime in with your ideas please. 

Lastly, I want to thank the members for an opportunity to serve them.  As a result of this endeavor, I now know much more about websites than I ever wanted to know.  I have learned about web hosting, setting up a web agent on my home computer (lets you try out a website before posting it online,) and a little more about HTML.  I see that WordPress  is free open source software operated to allow more people to have more access to the internet.  And that WordPress web page developers offer some of their design work for free in the form of free themes in the hope that they can sell more products.  I have found out that YouTube videos, such as ones one using WordPress or WordPress themes are seldom updated as new software versions come out, DAMHIK.  I would like to count as some of my accomplishments the creation of a club email for the club president so a club calendar could be easily kept and updated showcasing upcoming events.  I included a home page placement of an interactive map to our meeting sites making it easier for new members to find us.  By the way keeping that interactive map on the home page is why updates and posts go to another page!  I wanted someone new to the club to see that map first.  I installed a free Search Engine Optimization (SEO) tool on our website.   Within minutes of when our new site first went up, I tested major search engines to see if they could find our site.  You can test them yourself, just enter logical words like Sarasota woodworkers or others, and you will find us on the first page of search results so I thought a purchased SEO tool is not needed.  Our new site includes provisions to make it easier to view on mobile devices, which usually have more narrow screens.  Try it on your smart phone.  Also our site uses simple color schemes that facilitates viewing for people with less than perfect eyesight.   There is a modern word for this, but we should avoid things like text in yellow or orange or other lighter colors and favor a high contrast between text and background.   In addition, Adam Ross suggested that secretary’s notes from board meetings be included long before I was capable enough to include them myself.  It is still a valid idea, thank you Adam.  Also, some simple accounting of the finances should be made.  Like I said before, there is much more to be done.  And for those that understand:

-30-

Contents of this post provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.

November 2013 Turner’s Meet.

Denny surprised us on this one.  Does anyone want to fill in on the major step that is missing?

 

How's he going to make a tree out of this round piece of wood?

How’s he going to make a tree out of this round piece of wood?

You can bet that tree is going to come off of this lathe somehow.

You can bet that tree is going to come off of this lathe somehow.

Let's step over to the band saw.

Let’s step over to the band saw.

 

This is what came off the band saw.

This is what came off the band saw.

More trees to cut yet.

More trees to cut yet.

 

A similar process can be used to make stars.

A similar process can be used to make stars.

Content of this post provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.  Original photographs by John Phillips.

August 2013 Turner’s Meet.

Part of the program for this meet is a turned ball to hold pencils.  Denny showed us how.

Turned ball.

Turned ball.

 

Turned ball work in progress

Turned ball work in progress

Complete with pencil.

Complete with pencil.

Contents of this post and original photographs provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.

 

 

 

 

 

September 2013 General Meeting Show and Tell

Once again, members outdid themselves by bringing in some of their latest projects.

Tug Boat by Paul Anderson.

Tug Boat by Paul Anderson.

Paul designed the boat’s cabin to be removable to allow access to the batteries inside.  To allow for the cabin lighting, electrical contacts had to be designed that complete the circuit when the cabin was replaced on the boat.  He says this model has the same problems as a full size boat, and he added he made all the pieces.  The deck is 1/8″ ipe that he cut.

Scroll sawn bird puzzle by Terry Bair.

Scroll sawn bird puzzle by Terry Bair.

 

Guitars by Terry Bair.

Guitars by Terry Bair.

 

John Phillips with a goblet he made.

John Phillips with a goblet he made.

close up of the goblet.

Close up of the rosewood goblet.

Larry Simmons with his plane.

Larry Simmons with his plane.

Ed Goldberg made this table leg with diagonal grain as a mock up for the Krennov cabinet he is building.

Ed Goldberg made this table leg with diagonal grain as a mock up for the Krennov cabinet he is building.

Fretwork plaque by Joe Mathis.

Fretwork plaque by Joe Mathis.

John presented photos of some windows and a pecky cypress ceiling he is working on.

John presented photos of some windows and a pecky cypress ceiling he is working on.

 

Mike presented his microjig, a zero clearance table saw insert fitted for his table saw.  And as has happened numerous times before, Mike moves way to fast to get a photo that is not blurred!

Mike presented his microjig, a zero clearance table saw insert fitted for his table saw. And as has happened numerous times before, Mike moves way to fast to get a photo that is not blurred!

Bowl

Bowl

The law of averages says that this bowl is the buttonwood bowl made by Denny that is listed in my notes.  How can I go wrong?

 

 

A small ladder.

A small ladder.

Content of this post and original photographs provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.

September 10, 2013 General Meeting

Our general meeting featured speakers from Teak Decking Systems who are online at http://www.teakdeaking.com.

Teak advertising coasters from Teak Decking Systems.

Teak advertising coasters from Teak Decking Systems.

Dan was the first presenter, who works in their mill shop.  He has a B.A. in Forestry and wood utilization.  His woodworking led him to design and build spec houses and his work led him to Japan, which  in turn led him to marine carpentry.

Teak Decking Systems is located close to the Sarasota-Bradenton Airport where they build custom teak decks for yachts.  Usually they begin with a full size template of the yacht drawn on the floor in their shop.  Then the full size deck is built to fit and then shipped out to be installed.  Their procedure limits the number of fasteners driven into the deck of the boat.

Teak is chosen because is it long lasting and durable.  The closest non-exotic wood in durability is white oak which was used years ago for ships.  Dan’s main job is securing the teak raw material.  Previously, India, Thailand, Laos, and Myramar were sources, but not much is currently being cut in the old growth forests.  He says plantation grown is not the same and for his use, only the top 5% of the logs are useable.  Political considerations are overwhelming his sources.

David Barker, a chemical engineer, serves on their chemical team.  He reports that teak is a dense oily wood high in silica that most glues will not penetrate, even if it is first wiped with acetone.  His team experimented with West System epoxy, and says it will blush when used in a high humidity environment and that a mixing tolerance within 5% is critical and referenced their manual.  In addition, he says West System epoxy must be put on both surfaces because it is absorbed in, so should one use it, don’t squeeze the glue up too tight.  To counter their difficulty in working with that product, they formulated AP100 an epoxy system of their own design.

In favor of the club, they brought six sample kits of their epoxy and this writer had a chance to try out one of those kits.  During that trial, the epoxy mixed well and a most notable difference from other epoxies is that the AP100 seems to wet the wood as it is applied, in my mind penetrating in, for a better bond.  In that particular application, a repair to a desk leg, the product appears to be holding up in a structural manner.

Photos of the presenters are absent, as they were blurred.  Sorry.  On a brighter note, they have numerous offcuts for sale in their shop if anyone needs some teak.

Terry Bair reports that he has a DVD on the West System epoxy should anyone care to view it.

 

 

September 15 , 2013 Turner’s Meeting

Denny had a real treat for us in his plans to turn a bowl from monkey pod wood.  His completed project appears in other posts and at the end of this one.  Denny’s audience was soon thrown into a sneezing fit as the fine dust from the monkey pod filled the air, and we finished off a couple boxes of facial tissues.  From our reaction, this writer assumes monkey pod must be a tropical wood as many tropical woods bring forth allergic reactions in people, woodworkers in particular!  Does anyone have some expertise in workshop dust they would like to share?

Denny, do you want to elaborate on your procedures here?

 

Denny prepares for the demonstration.

Denny prepares for the demonstration.

 

Roughing cuts.

Roughing cuts.

DSC_0046

 

Interior roughing cuts.

Interior roughing cuts.

Smoothing the bottom.

Smoothing the bottom.

Monkey pod bowl.

Monkey pod bowl.

Content of this post and original photographs by Andrew DiLorenzo.

 

October 2013 General Meeting Show and Tell

Members brought in their favorite items for show and tell.  Floyd Yoder brought in his favorite Dewalt miter saw and detailed how he customized the fence to cut molding.  Here are some photos of Floyd’s crowning achievement!

Floyd Yoder

Fence modification allowing clearance for the saw mechanism while providing support for 7 1/4" crown molding.

Fence modification allowing clearance for the saw mechanism while providing support for 7 1/4″ crown molding.

The angle cut on this custom made fence allows the saw to operate, which it could not if a straight side was used here.

Floyd cuts crown molding at the same angle in which the molding will be installed.

Floyd cuts crown molding at the same angle in which the molding will be installed.

Some of Floyd's work.

Some of Floyd’s work.

Mike Swart brought in this wooded Mayan calendar.

Mike Swart brought in this wooded Mayan calendar.

 

John  Phillips showed us a carved bear.

John Phillips showed us a carved bear.

Tall bowl.

Tall bowl.

 

Shallow bowl.

Shallow bowl.

Also, not pictured, Terry Bair brought in a bottle holder.

 

Contents of this post and original photographs provided by Andrew DiLorenzo.

 

 

 

 

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